Tag Archive: Hannah Phillips


Young Artists Stage First Major Exhibition

Good headline!

There’s nothing like a good write-up in the local press! Hannah Phillips and Becky Roberts, who are exhibiting as featured artists down in Studio A1 at the moment, had an excellent article written about them in the Shropshire Star under the above headline.

Click the picture [left] to read the full article.

Their exhibition looks excellent – some really nice texture pieces and that great bluebell featured in the Shropshire Star photo. We’ve had a lot of people in so far, and quite a number of members of the public, too.

Congrats to Becky and Hannah – come down and see their work for yourself this coming Saturday.

Hannah Phillips & Becky Roberts at Studio A1

Stripes #2, Rebecca Crowell - no, not on exhibition at Studio A1, but a major influence for featured artist Becky Roberts.

Glyndwr students Hannah Phillips and Becky Roberts are our next featured artists at Studio A1. They’re hanging tomorrow, and will open their show on Wednesday. Here’s a taster for what they’ve got in store in the form of their artists’ statements:

Hannah Phillips

I focus on nature’s organic objects and processes to create my work. The beauty of nature has always interested me and I tend to explore this through different techniques and media.  No matter where my creativity takes me, this theme will continue to inspire me throughout my art practice.

My earlier work is based on organic objects, concentrating on using acrylic paint in order to expose their flowing lines and shapes which I am very interested in. I enjoy exploring the form of the object and how the addition of colour adds to this.
In my recent practice I worked with Richard Spence on advertising, and I have also worked collaboratively with Rebecca Roberts where the end result was a sculpture created from rusted metal. This was a turning point in my own work, as the combination of Rebecca’s work on rust and my work on nature led me to explore the beauty which an item of decay can induce. I enjoyed working collaboratively as it has an element of unpredictability, which is refreshing in comparison to working independently. I became more interested in how texture can bring a new dimension to a piece of work when used in an abstract form, rather than concentrating on the image.

I went on to explore the concept of beauty in decay though different media. Using various substances to create texture leads me to discover how vibrant paint merges, blends and interacts with the surface. This has been a key process in my work. Photographs of deteriorating organic objects recently spurred me to move into the medium of print in order to focus on the beautiful forms and lines which decay initiates. I found that the addition of water colour to this otherwise black and white technique prompted me to explore how a process which is commonly thought of as detrimental, can indeed be elegant.

My practice uses different media and techniques to show that things are not as they seem, in an effort to challenge the perception of the viewers.

Becky Roberts

I am a local art student from Wrexham, currently studying my second year of Fine Art at Glyndwr University.
My work consists of a wide variety of styles and techniques. This current exhibition focuses on a more abstract approach compared to my previous work.  These compositions are textural giving attention to colour, tone and layering. I was drawn to the rustic aspect of found rusted objects, using these as a starting point I aimed to re-crate this effect in paint reflecting the colour and textures of the pieces I found. I then moved onto other media’s including print and sculpture. My work developed from using different surfaces to varied materials

I went from painting to sculpture in a collaborative piece made alongside Hannah Philips. Hannah’s theme was ‘Beauty and Decay’ which included the study of flowers which was an opposite of my rusted metal theme. Despite this I believe the contradiction of nature and manmade items worked. The sculpture was made using orange rusty metal which was found; this again was a contrasting colour to the bluebell we chose to base our sculpture on. I found working both collaboratively and independently beneficial and enjoyable as there are different qualities in both approaches. Working independently allows more control however; I find lack of control in collaborative work results in interesting compositions as different ideas collide.

Rebecca Crowell, a Canadian painter was a main influence in my work; Crowell’s paintings are also based on found materials such as driftwood and stones. She chooses her colour pallet based on objects she finds or even elements such as sky or water. I also incorporated the colours of my found pieces into my abstract paintings as well as the textures of them. Another aspect of Rebecca Crowell’s work I found interesting, was how she composed her pieces. She selected different panels which she had painted and arranged them together and when happy with the outcome she fixed them together as one individual painting. I liked this idea as it made compositions changeable. The idea of combining different painted surfaces to create one piece appealed to me, therefore I pursued this.

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