We were very privileged to visit the studio of Fine Artist Rob Lawton.

“Rob Lawton was born in Abergavenny and brought up in Narberth, Pembrokeshire. He  studied at Carmarthen Art College and Edinburgh College of Art. He has exhibited work nationally and internationally which includes a scholarship to Florence, Italy, and a residency and group exhibition in Lithuania. His paintings are responses to representation and how they are perceived through cultural understandings.” from “Correspondences” 2013 – see below.

Just outside Oswestry, the studio has been created from one of a row of dis-used stables. Our eyes were excited by the situation, including the amazing old stable doors that present as works of art in themselves!

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Inside Rob has whitewashed and transformed the stable into an intriguing creative space. This has enabled him to branch out into making bigger paintings. Paintings that are as breath-taking as his previous precious small works that have often been displayed in various local venues.

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The brick ledges make a perfect display space for these smaller works and Rob has made the situation both a working space as well as aesthetically very pleasing and cosy.

IMG_8460 I have always found his paintings to be a complete delight – not only visually, but with their  enriching poetic and historic references. (Please note – sneak preview on the right of the photo above of Rob’s current painting for the Hillfort project – it looks stunning already, so cannot wait to see it finished!)

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IMG_8457Rob Lawton’s largest and most recent painting to date, recently displayed in the Oswestry Visitor Centre, references Ingmar Bergman’s last film Fanny and Alexander. It draws you in, invites you to walk through the painting. A masterpiece!

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Back in 2013 Rob was invited to be part of an exhibition in Plas Glyn-y-Weddw, Llanbedrog, Pwllheli, Gwynedd called “Cyfatebiaeth” – “Correspondences” – contemporary painting in response to, and in celebration of the life and writing of the poet and curate R.S.Thomas. Looking through the exhibition booklet one comes across his hauntingly beautiful painting, copied below – “tree absorbing the breath of nuns”, which as he pointed out to us has several meanings – the breath indicating  prayers and spiritual growth, and the actual physical affect of carbon dioxide – what we breath out, being absorbed by trees for growth.Robert Lawton 1 Robert Lawton writing

Thank you Rob Lawton for an inspiring and uplifting visit!

It occurs to me that we could run a featured artist slot on this blog on a fairly regular basis. If you are an artist who would like to be “featured” on our blog, let Diana know and send her details and photographs. dianabaur@hotmail.com

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