FREE

Giant Roller Printing 

with Amy Sterly

MAKE YOUR OWN PRINTS! FUN FOR EVERYONE! BANK HOLIDAY SATURDAY

5th MAY 2012 12.0-4.0

AT THE SCREAMIN’ CHICKEN GALLERY, OSWESTRY, (behind Sainsbury’s)

And the Opening of a show of prints and paintings of Amy Sterly at the Screamin’ Chicken Gallery from 3rd May-2nd June – open 11.0-3.0 Wed.-Sat.

About Amy Sterly:

Amy Sterly is originally from Chicago and received a B.F.A. in drawing and sculpture from Rockford College, Illinois in 1986.  She moved to the U.K. in 1989 and has since exhibited throughout the UK, Europe and the USA.  She received a Wales Arts International Travel award in 2004 to attend the Lessedra 3rd International Print Exhibition in Sofia, Bulgaria, and a Welsh Arts Council Grant in 2006 to research Printmakers in Wales.  She has also written articles for Printmaking Today, Welsh Art Now and Grapheion.

Since 2001 she has been a wax technician at Castle Fine Arts foundry where she began making small scale bronze bowls and buildings.  Her style is drawn from graphic and comic influences and there is frequently a humorous aspect to her prints and sculptures.  An emotion or attitude can be conveyed by the simplest of lines.

New work at the Screamin’ Chicken –

 

At the moment I am working on themes relating to the meaning of “home/house” – how is a building valued?  The property market uses buildings only as a commodity and does not acknowledge the deeper value of a house or it’s placement in the landscape.  People now think in this way during the last decade of inflated house prices.  The traditional woodcut prints of rural scenes are subverted with comic asides and discount stickers. I am playing with the images of the ‘rural idyll’ and the cheapening of our own homes.  The cost of our houses have gone up while the value of our home goes down respectively.

I work mainly in dry point and woodcut prints because I like the insistence of the printed line and the process of scratching into a surface to imprint into another.  This also translates into sculpture and casting wax into bronze – the process transforming the object into something else that you may not expect.

The Finnish architect, Alvar Aalto, wrote:  “buildings, like music, register and amplify the emotions of our times”.   This exemplifies my work.

Amy Sterly

  Amy Sterly is originally from Chicago and received a B.F.A. in drawing and sculpture from Rockford College, Illinois in 1986.  She moved to the U.K. in 1989 and has since exhibited throughout the UK, Europe and the USA.  She received a Wales Arts International Travel award in 2004 to attend the Lessedra 3rd International Print Exhibition in Sofia, Bulgaria, and a Welsh Arts Council Grant in 2006 to research Printmakers in Wales.  She has also written articles for Printmaking Today, Welsh Art Now and Grapheion.

Since 2001 she has been a wax technician at Castle Fine Arts foundry where she began making small scale bronze bowls and buildings.  Her style is drawn from graphic and comic influences and there is frequently a humorous aspect to her prints and sculptures.  An emotion or attitude can be conveyed by the simplest of lines.

New work at the Screamin’ Chicken –

 

At the moment I am working on themes relating to the meaning of “home/house” – how is a building valued?  The property market uses buildings only as a commodity and does not acknowledge the deeper value of a house or it’s placement in the landscape.  People now think in this way during the last decade of inflated house prices.  The traditional woodcut prints of rural scenes are subverted with comic asides and discount stickers. I am playing with the images of the ‘rural idyll’ and the cheapening of our own homes.  The cost of our houses have gone up while the value of our home goes down respectively.

I work mainly in dry point and woodcut prints because I like the insistence of the printed line and the process of scratching into a surface to imprint into another.  This also translates into sculpture and casting wax into bronze – the process transforming the object into something else that you may not expect.

The Finnish architect, Alvar Aalto, wrote:  “buildings, like music, register and amplify the emotions of our times”.   This exemplifies my work.

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